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  • Art & Culture
    Letizia Airos(September 10, 2019)
    On view for the first time in the United States, at Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, the drawings Carlo Levi realized during the artist’s retinal detachment. This is the story of a farmer from the gulf of Milazzo, who emigrated to Switzerland and decided to buy the works and keep them safe inside a barn.
  • Art & Culture
    Maria Klein(May 29, 2019)
    The exhibition “Leonardo da Vinci 3D," will will be held from May 30th to September 22nd in Milan, alongside the Cathedral of the Fabbrica del Vapore, shows the great Renaissance master like you've never seen him before.
  • The Comando Carabinieri Tutela Patrimonio (TPC), Italy’s “Art Squad” and the world’s first specialist police force in this sector, celebrates its 50th Anniversary with an exhibition held at the Quirinal Palace in Rome.
  • On May 2, 1519, Leonardo Da Vinci died in Amboise, France. This year all Italy honors the 500th anniversary of his death with exhibitions and events, down to and including lessons for adults in drawing and fresco painting. Milan's offerings are the most, however.
  • Leonardo Da Vinci’s "St. Jerome in the Wilderness" is currently on view in a free exhibition organized by the Vatican Museums at the Braccio di Carlo Magno in St. Peter's Square. The painting is then set to travel across the Atlantic to New York City, to be exhibited in the Metropolitan Museum. Finally, it will (supposedly) be shipped over to Paris to be part of the Louvre’s Blockbuster Da Vinci show, organized in honor of the 500th anniversary of the artist’s death.
  • Sharing images of paintings and sculptures by the greatest artists of the time was not as easy as pressing a button on an iPhone during the Renaissance. Jamie Gabbarelli, curator of prints, drawings, and photographs at the Rhode Island School of Design’s Museum of Art, argued during his lecture at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. that Renaissance innovation with prints broke with the past in crucial ways. His exhibit currently in the West building of the National Gallery explores the question of what happens when an image is shared with the world.
  • Installation view, Arte Povera: From the Olnick Spanu Collection, Magazzino Italian Art. Giovanni Anselmo, Here and There, 1971-1972; Giuseppe Penone, Tree of Three Meters, 1988. Photograph by Marco Anelli © 2018. Courtesy of Magazzino Italian Art.
    Art & Culture
    I. i.(March 02, 2018)
    Magazzino's latest exhibition "Arte Povera: From the Olnick Spanu Collection" presents a comprehensive overview on the artistic practice of 12 artists associated with the Italian Arte Povera movement such as Giovanni Anselmo, Alighiero Boetti, Pierpaolo Calzolari, Luciano Fabro, Jannis Kounellis, Mario Merz, Marisa Merz, Giulio Paolini, Pino Pascali, Giuseppe Penone, Michelangelo Pistoletto and Gilberto Zorio.
  • NYC's MET Museum Digitally Recreates Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel
    The Michelangelo exhibition at the MET is the cultural event of the season.  The New York Review of Books defined it “the finest show on the artist any of us will ever see”. To explore in depth the idea behind the exhibit, the Cultural Attaché of the Italian Embassy in Washington, DC, Renato Miracco talks to Carmen C. Bambach, curator the MET's Department of Drawing and Prints. 

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