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  • In this difficult moment for Italy I have been asking myself what to do at first, as the Editor in chief of a magazine dedicated to Italy, Italian Americans and Americans who have an interest in Italy. Running a classical reportage from Rome, penning an editorial column, offering a personal comment? My choice in the end has been to let a younger member of our editorial staff tell how she felt yesterday when news about the fall of Italy's government reached her in New York. In the spirit of i-Italy--that of bridging past and present, in Italy and America--the emotions of our young collaborators are as relevant as the op-eds of so many influential commentators. These also will follow, of course, in the next days. (Letizia Airos)
  • ROME - The front page of Il Sole-24 Ore, Italy's leading financial daily, said it all today, in a gigantic headline with just two words, written in 6-inch-tall letters: FATE PRESTO - Do it fast. And fast is what is happening today. President Giorgio Napolitano's appointment yesterday of the prestigious Mario Monti, front-runner to replace Berlusconi as premier of a government intended to stop the dithering, paved the way. Things are indeed speeding up, and today the political know-it-alls were already putting together a guess list of possible ministers to serve with Monti. This weekend is shaping up as crucial, and when I phoned the Quirinal Palace to see about a possible visit (the palazzo (it's open every Sunday), I was told that it will likely be closed for consultations with party leaders. Berlusconi's resignation, following a vote--due this weekend--over the budget as presented to the EU, is moving closer.
  • At Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, Beppe Severgnini, the most sold Italian author abroad (columnist on Corriere della Sera and The Financial Times) Jacob Weisberg (Slate Magazine) and Stefano Albertini (Director of Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò) discussed the release of Severgnini's latest book "Mamma Mia!"
  • Had the Berlusconi government fallen, it was expected that a technical cabinet to be headed by the prestigious economist Mario Monti, 69, was to take over until a controversial election law could be rewritten and early elections be held. Monti’s front-running position makes it all the more important that on the day after the confidence vote his hard-hitting editorial—it had to have been prepared well ahead of time—ran in the daily Corriere della Sera.
  • I would like to see a technical government put in charge to handle the crisis, and rewrite the election law – while protecting the right of overseas Italians to vote—followed by elections next Spring. And may the best man or woman win.
  • I would like to see a technical government put in charge to handle the crisis, and rewrite the election law – while protecting the right of overseas Italians to vote—followed by elections next Spring. And may the best man or woman win.
  • Voting in three separate elections this May and June, Italians gave a black eye to the center-right government headed by the London Economist’s favorite Italian politician, Silvio Berlusconi. Here are this week's consequences...

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