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  • Voting is a private matter; that's why there are curtains on the polling booths. So when I-ITALY Magazine asked for reflections upon my preference - and vote - for Donald Trump, I was hesitant, but agreed nonetheless to present what would be a counter opinion to many they had received.
  • Today’s Italian American voters are as likely to vote for Bernie Sanders as they were to vote for their semi-co-ethnic Bill De Blasio; or for Barack Obama whose name also ended in a vowel. Here I will try to explain Bernie's place in Presidential preference polls among more or less likely Italian American voters. You might think that among Italian American voters, Bernie’s major opponent is Hillary Clinton, but it’s really “The Donald” Trump.
  • The proposal for a revision of the election process finally made it into the Chamber of Deputies this week, as neo-Premier Matteo Renzi had promised, but it does not quite resemble the deal expected after he and former Premier Silvio Berlusconi had a widely publicized (and widely criticized) meeting to hash it out. In the Senate, Beppe Grillo, head of the Movimento Cinque Stelle, went on a North Korean-style warpath, casting out dissidents. New polls show center-right and center-left neck and neck, and, for Grillo, disapproval.
  • In Italy's most important national general elections in half a century, turnout is expected to be low by the usual standards, but the stakes are extraordinarily high, and begin with the search for finding ways and means to stimulate the economy. And can the pre-election battle lead to a functional coalition?
  • The John D. Calandra Italian/American Institute hosted a conference presenting the book "Altreitalie: Cittadinanza e Diritto al Voto", in an evening of discussion about the Italian vote abroad