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  • New York City and Italy have a great deal in common, starting and ending with self-destructive electorates; voters who are intent on putting into office people who, in one way or another, hold them in contempt. In both democracies, The People are generally too ignorant and self-absorbed to notice that the pain they feel is self-inflicted. How does this happen?
  • At the primaries of the Democratic Party (PD), Pier Luigi Bersani has triumphed, walking away with 63.45% of the votes over his younger rival Matteo Renzi who won only 36.48%. What are the future possible scenarios for the Italian politic?
  • The First Annual Forum in Italian American Criticism was held in Manhattan in 2008 at which internationally renowned scholars were invited to comment on “The Status of Interpretation in Italian American Studies.” After the lively event, I was given the pleasant task of lightly editing and arranging the contributions into a volume of the same name as the 30th volume in the highly respected Forum Italicum book series in Italian and Italian American Studies published in the spring of 2012. It is well worth a read by anyone who recognizes the value of the Italian experience in America and wishes to know who are the major players in the game.
  • Everyone is talking about the new New York State law that gives non-heterosexual couples the right to get married, but the belated law is really about recognizing homosexuals as what they are --- people. Unfortunately, the right to marry law needed the ideological right to get passed.
  • Over half the country is rejoicing this week because a nationwide referendum drew a stunning turnout of over 57% of those eligible to vote, and four pieces of center-right legislation dear to Premier Silvio Berlusconi were overturned. The referendum result made three essential points: first, that democracy is alive and well in Italy; secondly, that the media do not tell the whole story; and, thirdly, that it is time for the nation’s leaders to roll up their sleeves and get to work.
  • Given the unfortunate hot breakfast drink metaphors "Tea Party" and "Coffee Party" that have been brewed to simplify the already simple-minded partisan political debate in American politics over the past year, I have resorted to a "Cappuccino" allusion in this column to ask the non-musical question: “What does the election of Andrew Cuomo mean for New York State’s Italian Americans?" My informed guess is that, like his father Mario, Andy knows he owes little to the Italian American voter.
  • Some are saying that the Italian political situation is so surreal that it defeats any attempt at humor. They should think again. The comics are having a field day, and maybe a good laugh is just what’s needed
  • Op-Eds
    Jerry Krase(October 13, 2010)
    This year's reflection on the Columbus Day Parade in New York City has become much more problematic as at least one of the Italian American characters who was proudly marching in it has attracted more flak than Christopher did in 1992. To find out who it was you must read the rest of the article.

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