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Articles by: Chiara Basso

  • Sandro Botticelli (Italian, 1444 or 1445-1510), The Story of Lucretia, 1499-1500. Credit: Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston
    After having being separated for hundreds of years, two iconic, Renaissance paintings by artist Sandro Botticelli have been reunited, first in Italy and now in Boston at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. They are "The Tragedy of Lucretia,” purchased in 1894 by Isabella Stewart Gardner and first Botticelli to land on US soil, and “The Story of Virginia,” from the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo. They are the core of a new exhibit in the Gardner Museum's Hostetter Gallery (in the new wing), "Botticelli: Heroines + Heroes," through May 19.
  • (Photo credit: Gruppo Italiano)
    Futurist Eddie Yoon shared alarming data at a panel discussion with the Gotha of Italian specialty food in New York: younger generations want to cook less and less, in 20 years they won’t probably even drive to a restaurant but they will prefer to have their meals delivered at home, and they want to be fed as quickly as possible without waiting or staying in line. Is it real? Is the food industry ready for this? The panelists of Italian Table Talks, organized by Gruppo Italiano at the NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, had different thoughts about it.
  • When Simone Barlaam enters a room, the first things that you can notice are the height, about 6.2", the swimmer-like, broad shoulders, and the open smile. Simone, 18, dreams of participating in the Paralympics in Tokyo 2020 and there is a good chance that he can do it. This swimming champion was born with one leg shorter than the other but he likes to describe himself in this terms: "I'm a normal guy with a passion out of the ordinary."
  • Quando Simone Barlaam entra in una stanza a colpirti sono l’altezza, oltre un metro e novanta, le spalle larghe da nuotatore e il sorriso aperto. Simone, 18 anni, sogna di partecipare alle paraolimpiadi di Tokyo e ci sono buone possibilità che ce la faccia. Questo campione di nuoto è nato con un arto più corto dell’altro ma lui si descrive così: “Sono un ragazzo normale con una passione fuori dall’ordinario”.
  • In "Roman Holidays" Gregory Peck plays the role of an American reporter who falls in love with a European princess (Audrey Hepburn)
    Living the Italian Dream: Part 3. How is Italy treating male Americans who decide to relocate? Three men share their takes on la dolce vita: Rick decided to move back to the US when he became a father, John could move to Italy only after he retired and Bruce never left after having arrived by chance as a student. But behind their decisions, there is always a form of love...
  • When you hear the story of Elena Favilli and how she got to publish her series of books Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, two things come to your mind: first, she might as well be featured in one of these best-sellers dedicated to strong female role models, secondly, everybody, even boys, should get to know and appreciate the fearless women portrayed in these books, a literary phenomenon that over three years has been translated into 48 languages (the Chinese version will be released soon) and sold about 4 million copies.
  • Roger Cohen
    The New York Times columnist can be both passionate and rational when he talks about two countries that he loves, Italy and the US. Although in these nations “things can sometimes go to hell,” he firmly believes in the strengths of democratic institutions and therefore in a better future: “America is an idea or it is nothing.”
  • "Mozzarella Mamma" Trisha Thomas (Credit: Nicolee Drake)
    Living the Italian Dream - Part II. After hearing from Americans who moved to Italy as retirees, we talked with expats who have lived in the country for over two decades: Trisha, who is raising three children in Rome while trying to become "a good Italian mamma," and Alexandra, who moved to Florence to study the Renaissance and stayed for her Italian husband and "the quality of life." Part III next week will feature the stories of three men and their love affair with la Dolce Vita.
  • According to Peter Stastny, director of the documentary "Redemption Blues," redemption “is reaching out for something that you cannot reach, but at least you make the effort,” while music, in particular playing with other Jewish musicians in New York, is that personal “place where you can move forward in a Jewish way even if you are not religious.” In his movie, presented yesterday at NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimo’, Stastny explores what redemption means for the last survivors of the Holocaust. Often people who belong to the second generation, like him, feel the weight of that tragedy, the Shoah, but might spend their life with parents or relatives who never wanted to talk about what happened, like the director’s mother.
  • Lisa Condie
    Living the Italian Dream - Part I. Many Americans are fond of Italy and Italian culture to the point that some of them decide to move to Il Bel Paese. It can happen at any stage in life. Lisa Condie and Valencia Wolf sold their belongings and embrace the sweet Italian lifestyle after retirement. This is the first part of a series dedicated to American expats. Next week, we will tell you the story of Americans who have been living in Italy for over 20 years.

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