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  • French satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo, sparks outrage after publishing insulting cartoons portraying the recent earthquake that afflicted central Italy. Later, Italian cartoonists wreaked vengeance against France.
  • Directed by Simone Aleandri and Produced by Clipper Media with Rai Cinema, the documentary Sono Cosa Nostra celebrates the 20years ofLibera,anetworkof over 1600 associations fighting against all types of Mafias. Libera wasfounded by Don Ciotti, a priest from Turin, in 1995 and it uses land and assets seized from the Mafia to set up local food cooperatives, anti­drug projects, and community centers. Libera was also fundamental in the passing oflaw 109 which allowsthe seizure of assets belonging the Mafia.
  • On the eve of the Extraordinary Jubilee called by Pope Francis to begin Dec. 8, the Eternal City administration is plagued by accusations of corruption and Mafia infiltration. Most of the scandals predate the election in 2013 of left-leaning Mayor Ignazio Marino, a medical doctor considered above reproach but now subject to intense pressures to resign. However, corrupt officials are not the only ones to blame for Rome’s problems.
  • The “No to Mafia” movement passed through the Sicilian capital. Starting with the involvement of schools. Over 40 thousand students out on the streets, some coming from Europe and the United States. Also present was the NIAF (National Italian American Foundation), which, alongside the Fulbright commission and the Falcone Foundation, stipulated an agreement for six scholarships to be assigned to Sicilian students wishing to study in America and American students who would want to go study in Sicily. An ambitious project, involving three important institutions with the common goal of promoting research and scientific depth in the field of criminology, as was specified by the president of NIAF, John Viola.
  • Based on real events described in Gioacchino Criaco’s novel, BLACK SOULS (ANIME NERE) is a tale of violence begetting violence and complex morality inherited by each generation in rural, ancient Calabria, a real­ life mafia (‘Ndrangheta) seat in Southern Italy. The feature film directed by Francesco Munzi is opening in the New York, at the Angelika Fim Center on April 10.
  • Op-Eds
    Bill Tonelli(February 19, 2015)
    I’ve seen this claim made—verbatim, repeatedly—over the years, whenever Italian-American defamation is being denounced: the pseudo-statistic that 99.9 percent of us are law-abiding citizens with no involvement or tolerance for organized criminal activities. In other words, we’re 99.9 percent pure, just like Ivory Soap, and just as legit as any other nationality, and any suggestion to the contrary is the worst kind of bigotry...... Today, I believe it is time to say this: Once, we were all gangsters.
  • In his customary cordial way, President Giorgio Napolitano read the political elite of Italy the polite equivalent of the riot act. On Tuesday the president made his traditional end-of-year address to the ranking elders of the Italian state, and it obviously represented a carefully considered sermon. He also insinuated that he will end his term of office Jan. 14, after which a new president must be chosen.
  • Courageous police and magistrates are battling valiantly against a wave of high-level political corruption linked to organized crime in Rome that has just brought 37 indictments. The dozens more under formal investigation include a cabinet minister and a former mayor of Rome. The media have christened this latest Italian scandal “The Sack of Rome.” This month Transparency International ranked Italy 69th down its list of corrupt nations

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